EIFF 2015 – Review: Iona

film reviews | movies | features | BRWC EIFF 2015 - Review: Iona

Hello there. Welcome to BRWC. You should follow us on Twitter, listen to a FiLMiX, or browse around for interesting reviews, interviews and features. Don't forget to subscribe to our newsletter, and tell your friends. BRWC is short for battleroyalewithcheese.


Share BRWC:
Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on LinkedInBuffer this pageDigg thisEmail this to someonePin on PinterestPrint this pageShare on RedditShare on TumblrShare on StumbleUpon

Beautiful, savage and beguiling describes both the island and the central protagonist (stunning performance by Ruth Negga) of this film by writer/director Scott Graham.

This is a tense story that starts off grey, but, then pockets of light appear only for low rumbling in the distance before a terribly thunderous end. The film starts by a kitchen sink in a nondescript council house with Iona and her lover when her teenage son Billy (impressively played by Ben Gallacher) returns with two bottles of milk. Her teenage son, Billy who prefers to be called Bull reacts just like the proverbial bull in a china shop. His reaction necessitates Iona to take them both on an odyssey to the island of her birth: a place where much is seen and little is said much like her.

Scott Graham follows up his award winning debut, Shell, with this the closing film of the 2015 Edinburgh International Film Festival and it is incredible. He deftly shows the difference between islanders and those of the mainland and the struggles they have of faith, religion, family dramas all carefully mixed in with Iona’s own struggle with the paradox of missing the island life but hating how claustrophobic it can make you feel.


Subscribe to BRWC

The reason why the film is so enchanting, aside from the glorious cinematography, is down to the performance of Ruth Negga. It is often said that actors are luminous on screen but she truly is in this role and great things await her. The supporting cast act well and help move along this melodic film. I daren’t say it is slow but more reflective of how life is on an island with a small population that lacks its own doctor, hospital or even police force.

However, the final 20 minutes of the film descended into chaotic melodramatic and predictable mess which took away from the power and majesty of the rest of the film. Setting aside the final 20 minutes of the film I would say this is a must see.

Iona is a fitting end to the Edinburgh Film Festival showing a Scotland that most of us never see.

Share BRWC:
Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on LinkedInBuffer this pageDigg thisEmail this to someonePin on PinterestPrint this pageShare on RedditShare on TumblrShare on StumbleUpon


We hope you're enjoying BRWC. You should check us out on Facebook, look at our images on Instagram, or leave a comment below. Don't forget to subscribe to our newsletter, and tell your friends. BRWC is short for battleroyalewithcheese.


Trending on BRWC:

film reviews | movies | features | BRWC A Quick Rundown On The Disaster Artist

The Disaster Artist: Callum’s Take

By Callum Forbes / December 9, 2017
BRWC EXCLUSIVE: Isabella Blake-Thomas Interview

BRWC EXCLUSIVE: Isabella Blake-Thomas Interview

By Alton Williams / December 8, 2017
Nocturnal Animals (2016)

The Costumes: Nocturnal Animals (2016)

By BRWC / December 10, 2017
Night Of The Unspeakable

Review: Night Of The Unspeakable

By Daryl Bär / December 10, 2017
film reviews | movies | features | BRWC Kate Winslet’s Period Dramas

Kate Winslet To Receive Top London Critics’ Circle Film Award

By Alton Williams / December 11, 2017


<p>She is as picky about what she watches as what she eats. She watches movies alone and dines solo too (a new trend perhaps?!). As a self confessed scaredy cat she doesn’t watch horror films, even Goosebumps made her jump in parts! <br /> Follow her on @liquidmarmalade</p>