Alchemy Of The Spirit: Review

Alchemy of The Spirit is a spiritual melodrama co written by Xander Berkeley, Sarah Clarke and Mink Stole and directed by Steve Balderson. A movie which may prove divisive to audiences as there are many facets which could sway their judgment.

Alchemy Of The Spirit: Review

Oliver (Xander Berkeley) is an artist and deeply in love with his wife, Evelyn (Sarah Clarke). However, one day he awakes and finds that his wife has passed away and his life starts to change around him. He immerses himself in his art, almost making his wife part of it as he explores their life together and tries to put across what her presence truly meant to him.

Through imagined discussions with his late wife, Oliver manages to work through his emotions over losing his wife and his connection to art to come to a conclusion.



Alchemy of The Spirit is a spiritual melodrama co written by Xander Berkeley, Sarah Clarke and Mink Stole and directed by Steve Balderson. A movie which may prove divisive to audiences as there are many facets which could sway their judgment.

Firstly, a movie written by and starring a husband and wife team may immediately smell of a passion project. The thought that they perhaps couldn’t get their vision realised in cinematic form without making it themselves will certainly turn some audiences away. Then there are the visuals which may give an audience pause for thought.

Some may look at the movie and think that it’s using style of substance to justify its existence, using soft filters and lens flare to disguise the lack of plot.

However, there are those who will see Berkeley and Clarke’s project as a labour of love. A story that comes from a personal place filled with ruminations about the existence of the soul and where we go after we die. Some may also love the artistic visuals and use of a vivid colour pallet to tell such an intricate story.

There’s no denying that Xander Berkeley and Sarah Clarke have managed to put on screen a very personal story about their innermost feelings. There’s also no denying that Berkeley is an impressive artist with talents only those familiar with his acting would now become aware. However, at barely an hour and a half, it seems that the criticisms of style over substance to pad out a half-realised story may be more accurate.


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Joel found out that he had a talent for absorbing film trivia at a young age. Ever since then he has probably watched more films than the average human being, not because he has no filter but because it’s one of the most enjoyable, fulfilling and enriching experiences that a person can have. He also has a weak spot for bad sci-fi/horror movies because he is a huge geek and doesn’t care who knows it.

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