Wives Of The Skies: Review

Wives Of The Skies

WIVES OF THE SKIES – Dir. Honey Lauren

A journalist gets in over his head when he interviews two air stewardesses.
This raunchy tale involves two very pretty stewardesses, and a gulping reporter who tries to uncover their mysterious allure. 

It’s a sensual, sexual exploration that remains largely wholesome throughout, with an air of comfortability (apart from the reporter occasionally getting hot under the collar).



You see, one of the stewardesses, Fran (wonderfully played by Rachel Alig) is in to Kinbaku rope bondage – beautiful, exquisitely tied knots. I’m sure the viewer will share in the reporter’s choked surprise when he discovers her in such a state when invited for dinner.

The tale unravels further down the rabbit hole of these two women’s lives – and the reporter gets roped in headfirst.

Wives Of The Skies – This sweet, sensual tale will leave your head spinning, but with a fresh original take it’s bound to impress.

WOTS is a romantic dramedy, set in 1965, starring two stewardesses from Fine Air, a well-appointed airline, and the British writer who interviews them. At the same time, WOTS makes a contemporary socio-cultural statement regarding the meme of “the good girl, drawn bad”. WOTS is a romantic dramedy, set in 1965, starring two stewardesses from Fine Air, a well-appointed airline, and the British writer who interviews them. At the same time, WOTS makes a contemporary socio-cultural statement regarding the meme of “the good girl, drawn bad”. WOTS clarifies the impact of the overarching “men’s gaze” which objectifies women as carnal sex objects men seek, while they look for love. Along the way, addressing the primitive issue of Trust vs. Mistrust, WOTS displays the Japanese art of rope binding, Kinbaku.


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Lauren Turner is an Australian media specialist and keen cinephile. She loves Robert Eggers and can be found at her local offbeat cinema in Melbourne.

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