Spring: The BRWC Review

film reviews | movies | features | BRWC Spring: The BRWC Review

Indie horror auteurs Justin Benson and Aaron Moorhead follow up their post-modern head-fuck Resolution with this masterful romantic monster mash.

Following the loss of both his parents and his crappy bar job, Evan (Lou Taylor Pucci) jumps on the first flight out of California and finds himself in a gorgeous Italian coastal town. There he meets enigmatic siren Louise (Nadia Hilker), whose monstrous secret twists their whirlwind romance into something far stranger.

Expertly fusing disparate genres and aesthetics, Benson and Moorhead have crafted a work of pure magic with Spring. The film is exquisitely shot and edited, with the spectacular sweeps of the Italian coast and a woozy focus perfectly reflecting the heady daze of a budding summer romance.



But what really holds the film together is the deftly written relationship between the central couple, brought to authentic life by the two leads. It’s this genuine chemistry, and the moments of wicked humour peppered throughout, that anchor the film when things start to get very weird indeed.

Spring is boldly original, stunningly beautiful and emotionally intelligent flmmaking, the summer to Let the Right One In’s winter, and a wildcard for all those Best of the Year lists.


Let the Right One In (SwedishLåt den rätte komma in) is a 2008 Swedish romantic horror film directed by Tomas Alfredson, based on the 2004 novel of the same title by John Ajvide Lindqvist, who also wrote the screenplay. The film tells the story of a bullied 12-year-old boy who develops a friendship with a vampire child in Blackeberg, a suburb of Stockholm, in the early 1980s. Alfredson, unconcerned with the horror and vampire conventions, decided to tone down many elements of the novel and focus primarily on the relationship between the two main characters. Selecting the lead actors involved a year-long process with open castings held all over Sweden. In the end, the 11-year-olds Kåre Hedebrant and Lina Leandersson were chosen for the leading roles. They were subsequently commended by both Alfredson and film reviewers for their performances.


We hope you're enjoying BRWC. You should check us out on our social channels, subscribe to our newsletter, and tell your friends. BRWC is short for battleroyalewithcheese.


Trending on BRWC:

Michael Mendelsohn: Interview 

Michael Mendelsohn: Interview 

By BRWC / 6th May 2024 / 1 Comment
Unfrosted: The BRWC Review

Unfrosted: The BRWC Review

By BRWC / 14th May 2024
Velma Season 2: Review

Velma Season 2: Review

By BRWC / 9th May 2024 / 1 Comment
Infested – Review  

Infested – Review  

By BRWC / 5th May 2024 / 1 Comment
Classic Film Review: Ulysses (1967)

Classic Film Review: Ulysses (1967)

By BRWC / 29th April 2024

Cool Posts From Around the Web:



NO COMMENTS

POST A COMMENT

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.