FilmFrame Ep. 4 – The Florida Project

The Florida Project, FilmFrame, Sean Baker

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On episode four of the FilmFrame podcast, co-hosts Orla Smith and Scott Wilson discuss Sean Baker’s latest The Florida Project, as well as listing their top 5 A24 releases, and talking about Justice League, Paddington 2, and more.

TIMECODES
0:00-1:47 – Introduction
1:47-7:34 – Justice League
7:34-12:49 – Paddington 2
12:49-17:00 – Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool
17:00-20:14 – Scott rewatched La La Land
20:14-52:19 – Top 5 A24 films
52:19-1:20:09 – The Florida Project (spoiler discussion)
1:20:09-1:29:54 – Film swap: In Bruges
1:29:54-1:41:45 – Film swap: The Holiday
1:41:45-1:45:48 – Film swap recommendations for next week
1:45:48-1:48:34 – Outro

Follow along with our film swap, or email us any other film related thoughts and have them read out on next week’s show, at filmframepod@gmail.com

Keep up to date with Seventh Row’s Thelma week here.

Listen to more FilmFrame here.


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ORLA SMITH
Twitter
BRWC
Seventh Row

SCOTT WILSON
Twitter
CommonSpace

HOSTED BY
BRWC

MUSIC BY
Elissa Street

Set over one summer, the film follows precocious 6-year-old Moonee as she courts mischief and adventure with her ragtag playmates and bonds with her rebellious but caring mother, all while living in the shadows of Disney World.


Warm, winning, and gloriously alive, Sean Baker’s The Florida Project is a deeply moving and unforgettably poignant look at childhood. Set on a stretch of highway just outside the imagined utopia of Disney World, The Florida Project follows six-year-old Moonee (Brooklynn Prince in a stunning breakout turn) and her rebellious mother Halley (Bria Vinai, another major discovery) over the course of a single summer. The two live week to week at “The Magic Castle,” a budget hotel managed by Bobby (a career-best Willem Dafoe), whose stern exterior hides a deep reservoir of kindness and compassion. Despite her harsh surroundings, the precocious and ebullient Moonee has no trouble making each day a celebration of life, her endless afternoons overflowing with mischief and grand adventure as she and her ragtag playmates—including Jancey, a new arrival to the area who quickly becomes Moon’s best friend—fearlessly explore the utterly unique world into which they’ve been thrown. Unbeknownst to Moonee, however, her delicate fantasy is supported by the toil and sacrifice of Halley, who is forced to explore increasingly dangerous possibilities in order to provide for her daughter.
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<p>Orla thinks that Sofia Coppola is the greatest living director, so you’ll probably disagree with her at least 50% of the time. At least. She was born and raised in Watford which, for all you internationals out there, is near enough to London for you to mentally-register it as such, if you don’t know what a Watford is. She’s studying film and hopes to make a few of them herself one day, but in the meantime she’s happy watching, writing and talking about them every hour of every day. Really, it’s unhealthy. Somebody should stop her.</p>