The Devil Girl From Mars: Review

The Devil Girl From Mars: Review

The Devil Girl From Mars: Review

Originating as a play, “Devil from Mars” seized the opportunity to capitalize on the burgeoning trend of low-budget sci-fi B-movies, echoing the fascination with UFOs and extraterrestrials regularly emanating from the United States. While sharing thematic elements with its American counterparts like “The Attack of the 50 Foot Woman” and “Invasion of the Saucer Men,” this production diverges significantly in tone and execution.

The film unfolds in the quaint setting of a British pub, where a group of resilient Brits, brought together by chance, navigate the threat of an alien enemy. The dialogue, laden with turgid lines such as “Well, if we’re all going to die, dear, we may as well have a cup of tea,” sets a peculiar tone. Despite a noticeable decline in engagement as the plot progresses, “Devil Girl from Mars” manages to be oddly enjoyable in small doses.



As the narrative unfolds, the initial straightforward drama takes a surreal turn, evolving into a peculiar blend of high camp and pinch-yourself absurdity. The plot introduces Nyah (Patricia Laffan), a leather-clad dominatrix from a female-dominated planet in search of robust Earth men to replenish her dwindling supply. The film’s descent into campiness is accentuated by the appearance of a comically stubby killer robot, making “Metal Mickey” seem positively menacing by comparison.

The film’s Scottish setting introduces unintentionally humorous accents, with the exception of native Scot John Laurie, known for “Dad’s Army,” who refrains from uttering his famous “We’re doomed” catchphrase. The dialogue, delivered in a cacophony of bad Scottish accents, coupled with creaking sets and prolonged wide shots reminiscent of a stage play, results in a cinematic experience that hovers on the brink of being so bad it’s almost good.

The arrival of the leather-clad Nyah and her killer robot adds an unexpected layer of absurdity to the narrative, elevating the film to a level of unintentional hilarity. When faced with the extraterrestrial threat, the local police opt to leave the villagers to fend for themselves, displaying a lack of urgency and concern that adds to the film’s peculiar charm.

In conclusion, “The Devil Girl from Mars” offers a unique cinematic experience, straddling the line between unintentional comedy and low-budget sci-fi. While the film may not be a masterpiece, its odd blend of campiness and peculiar plot elements makes it a curious addition to the annals of British film history. Those drawn to the charm of obscure British cinema may find it worthwhile, especially considering the efforts of distributors like Network in bringing these lesser-known gems to light.


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