The Madness Inside Me: Review

The Madness Inside Me

The Madness Inside Me: Review

Madison (Merrin Dungey) is a forensic psychologist who lives in New York with her husband in their large apartment. Madison spends her work days talking to prisoners who have fallen foul to the law and through her interviews with those criminals, she tries to understand why people would do such terrible things as take a life.

Then one night, Madison hears a commotion and rushes to the bathroom where her husband is being accosted by a masked man who quickly overpowers her and knocks her unconscious.



Waking up in hospital, Madison only has a hazy recollection of what happened and when Detective Thompson (Thomas Q. Jones) tells her that her husband was killed, she retreats into her work and tries to get on with her life. However, the thought of making sense of her husband’s senseless murder leads her to find the killer but once she does, she starts to get closer to him to try and find out why he did what he did. Although whilst doing so, she starts to lose herself.

The Madness Inside Me is a psychological thriller written and directed by Matthew Berkowitz. Set in the middle-class area of New York it seems that Madison has it all; she has good friends, someone who loves her and a job that gives her great satisfaction. It’s unclear than as to why she does what she does.

The implication is that she wants to know why her husband was murdered, but the lengths in which she goes to defy logic as the audience aren’t let in on the secret. It’s one thing to be ambiguous about a character’s motives, but to completely keep the audience in the dark is a somewhat confusing and frustrating experience.

Merrin Dungey does a great job showing her character’s decline from the seemingly innocent and her performance plays well. The trouble is that with such a rapid change in character through the movie, it seems that the audience may have missed something. What starts out well, albeit a bit slow, turns into something that ramps up the sex and violence and borders on what could be called an erotic thriller.

For a movie that prides itself in wanting to understand the psychology of the worst in society, it seems to not understand basic psychology itself.


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Joel found out that he had a talent for absorbing film trivia at a young age. Ever since then he has probably watched more films than the average human being, not because he has no filter but because it’s one of the most enjoyable, fulfilling and enriching experiences that a person can have. He also has a weak spot for bad sci-fi/horror movies because he is a huge geek and doesn’t care who knows it.

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